The Joe Blow Report 2

Everything Is About Something Different

Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Blogs that are Worth their Salt

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It’s been a while since I posted on this blog. I’ve been re-stoking my boilers.

It’s also been a while since I posted any MacLeod Cartoons. When I checked his Facebook page (www.facebook.com/MacLeodCartoons) I found the following quote. What this man says about political cartoons can easily be said about me and my Joe Blow Report.  Kudos to James MacLeod.

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Joe’s Moto:  Everything is about something different.
–Joe

Written by Joe Blow

November 9, 2013 at 10:31 pm

Who Is Ali Farzat?

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I found this story posted on Cartoon Movement August 26, 2011:  Cartoonist Attacked by Syrian Regime compliments of Mike Flugennock at Sinkers.org.

This is what the scum of the Earth do to try to tell other people that they really are the worthless garbage. Every person on this Earth that believes they are decent, God-fearing, freedom-loving people have a vested interest in what’s done to their fellow men and women.

While the world’s media focus is on Libya and the downfall of Gaddafi, let us not forget that editorial cartoonists elsewhere are struggling for freedom. Well-known Syrian cartoonist Ali Farzat was brutally attacked by masked men, who broke his hands (to stop him drawing) and left him on the road outside Damascus. A stark reminder of the dangers cartoonists can face, but also of how they are feared by oppressors.

The comics blog at the Washington Post has called for cartoonists from all over the globe to draw cartoons in support of Ali Farzat. We hope to see some of these in our newsroom.


All the Christian and Non-Christian do-gooders that are all the time preaching love and forgiveness in their hearts are hardly any consolation to this man, and the lucky ones that were NOT murdered. President Barack Obama and his enablers’ gutless, feckless blather and non-action are no consolation either.

As someone that occasionally feels the wrath for speaking out about the obvious, here’s Mike’s offering:

–Joe

A Jew’s Few Worthy Words About America

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Harold Pinter (1930-2008) on “Art, Truth and Politics”pinterspeech-1

Harold Pinter, the Nobel Prize-winning British playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor and political activist died last week at the age of seventy-eight after a prolonged battle with cancer. In his 2005 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, Pinter excoriated US foreign policy. “The invasion of Iraq was a bandit act, an act of blatant state terrorism, demonstrating absolute contempt for the concept of international law.”

Born in 1930 into a Jewish family in London that had fled persecution in Poland and Odessa … Pinter was also well known as a vociferous critic of British and American foreign policy and an activist against nuclear proliferation, political repression and censorship. Harold Pinter won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2005. In his Nobel acceptance speech, titled “Art, Truth, and Politics” Joe Blow offers this excerpt:

HAROLD PINTER: The United States supported the brutal Somoza dictatorship in Nicaragua for over forty years. The Nicaraguan people, led by the Sandinistas, overthrew this regime in 1979, a breathtaking popular revolution.

The Sandinistas weren’t perfect. They possessed their fair share of arrogance, and their political philosophy contained a number of contradictory elements. But they were intelligent, rational and civilized. They set out to establish a stable, decent, pluralistic society. The death penalty was abolished. Hundreds of thousands of poverty-stricken peasants were brought back from the dead. Over 100,000 families were given title to land. 2,000 schools were built. A quite remarkable literacy campaign reduced illiteracy in the country to less than one-seventh. Free education was established and a free health service. Infant mortality was reduced by a third. Polio was eradicated.

The United States denounced these achievements as Marxist-Leninist subversion. In the view of the US government, a dangerous example was being set. If Nicaragua was allowed to establish basic norms of social and economic justice, if it was allowed to raise the standards of healthcare and education and achieve social unity and national self-respect, neighboring countries would ask the same questions and do the same things. There was, of course, at the time fierce resistance to the status quo in El Salvador.

I spoke earlier about “a tapestry of lies” which surrounds us. President Reagan commonly described Nicaragua as a “totalitarian dungeon.” This was taken generally by the media, and certainly by the British government, as accurate and fair comment. Read the rest of this entry »

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